About me

Natasha_MauritsMost of the research work I currently do is best described as Clinical Neuroengineering: I translate a clinical neurological problem to a physico-mathematical problem, find a solution using state-of-the-art mathematical techniques and translate this solution back to neurology for application by neurologists, technicians and researchers from other fields. A research project can cover any one or more of these steps. I strongly believe in cross-disciplinary research and work together with researchers not only from neurology, but also from psychology, physiology, computer science and applied mathematics. A brief introduction to my research is given in this Ted-like presentation from September 2016 (produced by Scripta Communicatie).

My job

I am Professor of Clinical Neuroengineering at the Department of Neurology/Clinical Neurophysiology of University Medical Center Groningen (NL) and visiting professor at the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Strathclyde University in Glasgow (UK).

My other positions and responsibilities are:

Education

  • Master degree: Numerical and applied mathematics, University of Groningen (1994)
  • PhD degree: Mathematical modeling of complex systems – microphase separation dynamics in polymer liquids, University of Groningen (1998)

Previous positions

  • Associate professor of Biomedical signal analysis, UMCG (2006-2011)
  • Assistant professor of Biomedical signal analysis, UMCG (2003-2006)
  • Biomedical informatician, Department of Neurology, UMCG (1999-2008)
  • Owner/CEO InterScale (1998-2000)
  • Postdoc, Biophysical Chemistry, RuG (1998-1999)

My Research

In june 2007 I gave my inaugural lecture entitled ‘Patients in numbers: mathematics in clinical neurophysiology’.

Most of the research work I currently do is best described as Clinical Neuroengineering: I translate a clinical neurological problem to a physico-mathematical problem, find a solution using state-of-the-art mathematical techniques and translate this solution back to neurology for application by neurologists, technicians and researchers from other fields. A research project can cover any one or more of these steps. I strongly believe in cross-disciplinary research and work together with researchers not only from neurology, but also from psychology, physiology, computer science and applied mathematics. This is reflected in the topics of my scientific publications and also in the examples of completed and ongoing PhD projects.

Job opportunities

Any job offers will be published on my News page. However, I am always interested in getting to know you and your research ambitions and plans if you are interested in pursuing a career in clinical neuroengineering (at PhD or postdoc level) and have the possibility to finance your own project. Our university and research school provide support in this matter, as well. Please review their information to see if you might be eligible, before contacting me. For students from Mexico (Conacyt) or Chile (Becas Chile or Conicyt), there are also government scholarships.